So you’re probably missing out on a lot of points – let’s change that.

What even is a credit card point?

A credit card point is a unit of reward offered by credit card companies to incentivize card usage. It's an easy way to get perks, like free flights, without spending more money – you just have to be smart about which cards you use.

Typically, you get 1 point for every dollar spent. Some cards offer more points (a "multiplier") for specific categories like dining or travel, allowing you to earn rewards faster when you spend in those areas.

Whole Foods ·
$89
4x
356
pts
ConEd ·
$126
1x
126
pts
Sweetgreen ·
$18
2x
36
pts
yearly grocery spend
$10,000
4x
40,000
CDG

New YorkParisCDG

Monday, Sep 4 20,000
Economy · Nonstop
+tax
JFK

ParisNew YorkJFK

Tuesday, Sep 12 20,000
Economy · Nonstop
+tax

Pointhound maximizes both earning and redeeming points.

For example, let's say you spend $10,000 each year on groceries. With most cards, you'd earn 10,000 points (1x). Open a Pointhound-suggested card and that number soars to 40,000 points (4x) – a game-changer.

Now that you've earned 40,000 points, Pointhound's search tools helps you find and book amazing deals on roundtrip flights to Paris. Those flights would otherwise cost you $2,000 or 80,000+ points if you used your card's portal.

Why redeeming your points for flights is the best value.

Flights are by far the most valuable way to redeem credit card points – think 15x cash back or gift cards. That's because many airlines use points to help fill seats that are otherwise empty, lowering the price of booking with points dramatically.

Points
Redemption
Total value
Value/point
10k
Flights found on Pointhound
$100–$1,500
1–15¢
10k
Cashback
$100
1¢
10k
Gift card
$60–$100
0.6–1¢
X

Opening a credit card is actually often good for your financial health.

Opening a new credit card is a net positive for your credit score.

Opening a new card won't negatively impact your credit over time – it can potentially boost your credit score in just a few months. The new card's positive influence on credit utilization and number of accounts can work in your favor.

Multiple credit cards can positively impact your credit score.

Paying off your credit cards in full each month allows you to benefit from having multiple cards without harming your credit score. In fact, it can even boost your credit score.

Annual fees often pay for themselves with statement credits.

Credit cards with annual fees often provide benefits that outweigh the cost, especially when factoring in the signup and ongoing points.

What is the value of a single point?

To determine the value of a point, divide the dollar value of an offer by the points needed for redemption. For example, if 50,000 points can book a $500 flight, your point's value is $500/50,000, or 1 cent per point.

On average, flights typically offer 1 cent per point, but it can vary. We use color labels: green for deals above 2 cents, yellow for 1-2 cents, and red for deals under 1 cent to help you maximize your credit card points.

$2,500 retail
>2¢ per point
50,000
$500 retail
1-2¢ per point
50,000
$250 retail
<1¢ per point
X
50,000

FAQ: how can we help?

When should I open a new card?How many credit cards make sense to open at one time?What does it mean if my application was rejected?

Pointhound maximizes both earning and redeeming points.

Our simple onboarding will walk you through how to get more points without changing how much you spend.